The beginning of my Compositing career started with After Effects, and while I’m now living and breathing Nuke, there’s one thing I still miss — the ease of use of After Effects’ animation tools.

Coupled with a recent fascination with bezier curves, I decided to set out and see if I could bring the most basic functionality from After Effects, “easy ease”, into Nuke, with a way to control the smoothness of that curve.

To start out, I wanted to explore what was already possible. Selecting a keyframe and hitting “h” on your keyboard changes the keyframe type to “horizontal”. If you do that on the first and/or last keyframe of a curve, you get a smooth ramp in/out. However, if it’s not easing enough, grabbing one of the handles and trying to adjust the curve quickly results in frustration.

Continue Reading "Programmatically editing animation curves in Nuke."

This week’s newsletter includes:

  • A NukeX license giveaway, courtesy of our friends at Foundry.
  • A signup for Foundry’s Nuke 12.2 release webinar.
  • Gizmos from Jed Smith to more-accurately match black levels, and compress highlights & shadows while retaining detail.
  • A blog post from Attila Gasparetz demonstrating the use of expressions with Higx’s Point Render.
  • A fascinating video titled, “Brown; color is weird”.

Click here to read!

When warping, I always use ST Maps as the base, as they provide so much extra control. Nuke’s built-in “MotionBlur” node, RSMB, and other nodes are available to generate motion blur from our warped input images, however, these nodes are generating new motion vectors, essentially making their best guess at where the pixels are travelling. Wouldn’t it be better to use our warp data to drive this instead?

Continue Reading "Quick Tip: Add accurate motion blur to your warps."